Members of the Company who served as Lord Mayor

Alderman Sir Alan Traill GBE QSO

Alderman Sir Alan Traill GBE QSO
Lord Mayor 1984. Master 1979. Sir Alan Traill followed his father, the late George Traill (Master 1955), into the insurance industry. Since leaving Lloyds in 2000 he has been an insurance consultant, arbitrator, mediator and expert witness. He is also a Past Master of the Musicians Company and his special interest is assisting with the development of musicians and their all round education. He is currently Chairman of the Governors of The Yehudi Menuhin School, and a Member of the LSO Education Committee.

Alderman The Rt Hon Lord Mais of Walbrook GBE (1911-1993)

Alderman The Rt Hon Lord Mais of Walbrook GBE (1911-1993)
Lord Mayor 1972-3. Master 1968. Lord Mais was a civil engineer and, following distinguished military service during the Second World War, became Chairman of Peachey Property Corporation. He was responsible for redeveloping Craythorne House in Newgate Street when it had been acquired by the Company. He was also a liveryman of the Paviors’ Company and founder member of the World Traders’ Company.

Alderman Sir Samuel George Joseph Bt (1888-1944)

Lord Mayor 1942-3. Joseph was a Lloyds’ underwriter and father of the late the Rt Hon Sir Keith Joseph Bt MP, one time Secretary of State for Education and Science.

Alderman Sir Walter Vaughan Morgan Bt (1831-1916)

Alderman Sir Walter Vaughan Morgan Bt (1831-1916)
Lord Mayor 1905-6. Master 1911. Morgan was also a liveryman of the Loriners’ Company. The son of an old established family of wool staplers in Wales which had suffered reverses, he entered Christ’s Hospital at the age of nine. On leaving school he embarked on a career in banking and with his brothers founded the well-known firm of Morgan Brothers. He was elected Alderman for Cordwainer Ward in 1892 and had a distinguished civic career. He was noted for his generosity to charities and gave particularly long and valuable service to Christ’s Hospital where he held the position of Treasurer.

Alderman Sir Robert Walter Carden Bt MP JP (1801-1888)

Alderman Sir Robert Walter Carden Bt MP JP (1801-1888)
Lord Mayor 1857-8. Master in 1855, 1866 and 1876. A stockbroker by profession, Carden was a noted philanthropist, a Member of Parliament and a highly regarded member of the Court of the Company. He was elected Alderman for Dowgate Ward in 1849. He stood unsuccessfully for the seat of St. Albans in the General Election in 1850, but was elected as Member of Parliament for Gloucester in 1857. He was the first Lord Mayor to abandon the Water Procession to Westminster.

Alderman Henry Winchester (1777-1838)

  Alderman Henry Winchester (1777-1838)
Lord Mayor 1834-5. Master in 1829 and 1839. He was elected as Alderman for Vintry Ward in 1826. At the General Election in 1830 he was returned as Member of Parliament for Maidstone and voted against the Reform Bill. However, the dissolution in the following year deprived him of his seat. From 1835 until his death he was President of St. Thomas’s Hospital.

Alderman William Bridgen (1709-1779)

Lord Mayor 1763-4. Bridgen served as Junior Warden in 1744 and Senior Warden in 1745. He never served as Master. He was a wine merchant with premises in Mincing Lane and was elected Alderman for Farringdon Within Ward in 1754.

Other notable members of the Company

John Torr Foulds

John Torr Foulds
John Torr Foulds became Master of the Company in 1801. He had become a Liveryman in 1782 and must rank as one of its more distinguished members. Born in Derbyshire in 1742 Foulds began work as a young millwright at London Bridge Water Works in 1763 and remained to become its chief millwright, surveyor and engineer until his death in 1815. Old London Bridge had narrow arches which provided a considerable force of water. The first two arches of the bridge were originally fitted with water wheels to provide power to pump water for domestic and industrial purposes in 1582, but by private enterprise. In 1701 London Bridge Waterworks Company was formed as a statutory company and rapidly improved the machinery. It was described in 1745 as follows: ­“in the first, second and fourth arches of the north end of London Bridge are fixed the water works commonly called London Bridge Water Works, which are worked by the common tide water of the River Thames; the works consist of five large water wheels and Sixteen Engines for raising of water. The several wheels and cranks are uniform and so regularly fixed so that their motion is continual either by day or night, upon the Flood as well as upon the Ebb-Tides without the least assistance from any person or shifting or altering any one individual link. At high and low water only they stand still near three quarters of an hour more or less according to the return of tides, their motion increasing or decreasing in proportion to the velocity of the water …”

The growing demands of navigation increasingly conflicted with the obstructions required by the waterworks, and in 1761/2 the Corporation agreed to open a larger waterway for vessels in the centre of the bridge. To assist the Waterworks Company, two further arches were leased to it. Foulds’ first task was to assist in the installation of a 32-foot waterwheel in the fifth arch. By 1779 he had become chief millwright, and proved his ability in fire fighting when the tower into which the water was pumped caught fire. He then devised an apparatus for direct pumping to the mains to avoid rebuilding the tower.

He was then involved in a wide variety of activity in maintaining the output of the machinery. In 1782 a steam engine was installed to supplement the water power, and all five wheels were renovated. He installed a sixth wheel in the fourth arch in 1795, having previously been promoted to senior staff. Continuing in office until his death, he was consulted about the deteriorating condition of one of the wheels only a few weeks before he died. The water wheels did not long survive him, since the Company was wound up in 1822 prior to the rebuilding of the Bridge and the machinery was transferred to the New River Company.

Foulds received the silver medal of the Society of Arts in 1780, and the gold in 1795. He was a leading figure in the Master Millwrights’ Association and a member of the Smeatonian Society of Civil Engineers. In 1791 he was appointed Assistant Engineer in the Surveyor’s Office of the Corporation of London. Thereafter he was heavily engaged in design of the new docks on the Isle of Dogs, and also became engineer to the Shadwell Waterworks Company along the river.

Sir John Hall

Sir John Hall was the son of the Rev John Hall of Stannington, Yorkshire, where he was born in 1779. He became a freeman and liveryman of the Company in 1806, and in the following year was appointed consul and agent for the maritime seigneury of Papenburgh in East Friesland. Thereafter he was consul general for Hanover in the United Kingdom from 1816 to 1854, served as Sheriff of Essex in 1817, and was secretary to St Katherine’s Dock Company from 1824 to 1853. He was knighted in 1831, and died in 1861.

He joined the Court in 1839 and was successively fined for the offices of each Warden and Master from 1843 to 1845. The reason for his joining the Company is unknown, hut he was most probably introduced by John Foulds in view of the connection of both with London Docks. His attendance at Court meetings seems to have been negligible.

Henry Graves

Henry Graves
Henry Graves was born in 1806 and became a freeman of the Company by redemption in 1835, and an Assistant in 1863. He served as Master in 1868/69, from November 1874 to July 1875 following the death of the Master, Mr. J. L. Evans, and again in 1877/78. He died on 23rd August 1892 and is buried in Highgate Cemetery.

Besides a gilt rose-water bowl and a marble bust of Apollo, he gave numerous portraits and prints to the Company including those of William III and Queen Anne, as well as two of himself. This is unsurprising in that he was a dealer in pictures and engravings so well known that, upon his death, The Times not only printed an obituary, but also carried a very long editorial upon his influence upon the Art World. His gallery at 6 Pall Mall was a major centre for the artistic world of his time. As a record of influence the following extracts from that editorial are illuminating:-
“The death of Mr Henry Graves, for so long a time a conspicuous figure in the world of art, breaks a link with a distant and interesting past … he had known Wilkie, had published for Constable, and had for years had Turner to sup with him every Sunday, and had contributed more, perhaps, than any other man to the fame and fortune of Landseer … he had been a pushing and successful man of business before he was 21. His great time was from 1830 to 1870, and during those 40 years it is not too much to say that no man was more closely connected with the movement of the arts in England, so far, at least, as native painters and engravers were concerned … His talent was that of judging the market with curious precision; of knowing what would take the public taste, and of sparing neither money nor pains in bringing such work before the public.

He helped to enrich many artists … he paid Flatow, the dealer, the vast price of £20,000 for Mr Frith’s “Railway Station” and the copyright … so with Landseer who became rich not by the sale of his pictures, but by that of the engravings from them. Another matter which is likely to be a good deal discussed on the occasion of Mr Grave’s death is the present and future position of engraving as an art. As he was by far the largest publisher of prints that ever lived, he must be held in a measure responsible for the present state of the art, be it satisfactory or the reverse. It is eminently desirable that the great traditional excellence of English engraving should he maintained, and that the men of today and tomorrow should not fall below the standard set by the old mezzotinters”.

Sir Horace Louis Petit Boot

Sir Horace Louis Petit Boot
Sir Horace Louis Petit Boot was admitted to the Livery on the 13th August 1897 and became Master on the 1st July 1936. He was a man of diverse interests. By profession a civil engineer, he was the founder and Chairman of the Eastwood Group of Companies. Amongst those interests were, Presidency of the Institute of Arbitrators and the Institute of Municipal Engineers, and of the Royal East Berkshire Agricultural Society. He was a Life Member of the National Trust and interested in and a great supporter of the Clay Industries. He was a Governor of Sheffield University and also a Liveryman of the Loriner’s Company. It is noteworthy that in “Who’s Who”, his primary recreation was listed as “work”. He was distinguished also in the City of London and in 1940 was elected a Sheriff, being subsequently knighted for his services. The portrait by A E Cooper now hanging in the entrance to Cutlers Hall shows Sir Horace in shrieval robe wearing the chain of office which was a gift by his many friends in the City.

The Right Hon Sir John William Fisher Beaumont PC, QC (1877-1974)

The Right Hon Sir John William Fisher Beaumont PC, QC (1877-1974)
Sir John William Fisher Beaumont was the son of Edward Beaumont (Master 1900) and grandson of James (Clerk 1835-1870). He was educated at Winchester College and Pembroke College, Cambridge. Called to the Bar in 1901, he served as Chief Justice of Bombay 1930-43 and became a member of the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council in 1944. He was Master in 1951.

Charles Welch FSA

Charles Welch FSA
Charles Welch was born in 1848, son of Dr Charles Welch (liveryman 1840, fined for Master 1887 and who died in 1895). He became a freeman in 1869, joined the Court in 1901 and served as Master in 1907. Upon leaving the City of London School in 1866, he joined the staff of Guildhall Library and served there for 40 years, being librarian from 1888 until 1906. An obituary in the Antiquaries Journal states “under his guidance the Library increased both in size and usefulness, and on his retirement it was in London second only to the British Museum”. He was elected a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries in 1890, and served on its Council in 1894. He died on 14th January 1924.

If the Company has only contained one pre-eminent historian amongst its ranks, it can be particularly proud of his distinction. His publications upon the history of London and its Guilds were numerous. As early as 1880 he produced a short history of the Stationers’ Company, followed in 1890 by another on the Gardeners’ Company. There followed a massive history of Tower Bridge in 1894 to mark the opening of the present bridge; ‘Numismata Londinensia’ (an account of medals struck by the Corporation) in the same year; and ‘A Modem History of London’ in 1896. Histories of the Pewterers’ Company in 1902 and the Paviors’ Company in 1909 served as preparations for his monumental history of the Cutlers’ Company in two volumes, published in 1916 and 1923. During the same period, he wrote ‘London at the opening of the twentieth century – contemporary biographies’ 1905; ‘A History of the Monument and Great Fire of London’ 1907; ‘a History of the Royal Exchange’ 1913; and ‘The Coat Armour of the City Livery Companies’ 1914. In 1911 he joined with Canon Benham to write a work on Medieval London. In addition he edited the Churchwarden’s accounts of All Hallows, London Wall, the Register of Freemen under Henry VIII, and produced numerous papers on various aspects of City history.